Home > Training & Development > An Introduction to Counselling Skills

An Introduction to Counselling Skills

By: Anna Martin - Updated: 3 Mar 2017 | comments*Discuss
 
Counselling Skills Listening

Counselling is a specialist vocation that requires professionals to train in a number of different ways. Modules and coursework are complemented by supervised learning and placements, and also include assessments. To gain an accredited Counselling qualification you must have a strong interest in the field and be open to furthering your understanding of self-awareness and self-development.

Counselling is an interesting subject matter that can be used to create, and foster, positive attitudes in many vocations and situations. It also provides a genuine understanding of the needs of others and offers an insight into your own personal issues.

The Bare Essentials

Counselling skills are taught on many different levels. To gain a broad background knowledge of the subject it is essential that students consider an Introductory course. This type of course is open to students of all backgrounds, and does not require that you have experience of working in the therapeutic field. A Certificate in Interpersonal Skills, which is a Level 1 course, provides students with all the sufficient material required to progress onto the next stage of their counselling career.

An introductory level of counselling explores counselling practice and aims to develop qualities of empathy, non-judgmental understanding and unconditional positive interaction. Active listening, reflection, restating and summarising are some of the additional skills students will be able to develop further.

What is Covered?

An Introduction to Counselling course may cover subjects that include:
  • What is Counselling?
  • The essential qualities required for a helping interview.
  • Ethical use of interpersonal skills.
  • How to apply challenging skills.
  • The identification, and use, of skills in an applied context.

Homework

Students may also take part in group discussions, role-play and small group work. Written coursework, outside of the classroom, are also required, so students need to be aware of the extra time required to complete all parts of their study. Assessments are usually carried out by observation of the student’s practical skills. Maintaining a candidate diary – where students record personal experiences – may also be a consideration.

Students are encouraged to use reflection as a basis for their work, and will be expected to share their work with others on the course. Feedback from tutors, and other students, will provide a useful method of additional learning and self-development, and all students are expected to help in the learning process of others.

Building a Solid Foundation

An Introduction to Counselling provides a well-informed foundation from which students can build a successful, and rewarding, counselling career. Counselling theories, themes and contexts are explored and students are able to develop skills they can then transfer to the workplace or personal relationships. Prospective students who are already working in a therapeutic profession, in health care, education, pastoral care or even human resources, will also benefit from a good grounding in counselling.

On completing an Introductory Counselling course, and developing their counselling knowledge further through a subsequent degree or diploma, many students will decide to work in a counselling profession. However, most of the students will simply use the knowledge gained from the course as a positive means of progression through their existing careers.

You might also like...
Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice..
I have worked in HR for the last 7 years and I am now looking to change careers.I have had counselling and CBT in the past and I have found both (in particular the latter) very helpful to me.I am curious as to how I could become a CBT therapist; what options are available and how I can leverage my skills as an HR professional in this industry. Many thanks, Tom
Tom - 3-Mar-17 @ 5:42 PM
I'm looking to do an Introduction to counselling course, within Oxfordshire. I work with Children and Parents could you recomend a short course for me Thank you .
Roz - 22-Feb-13 @ 2:59 PM
Having gone through counselling, I have huge admiration for those who listen to the problems of others all day and help them decide on a course of action. It sounds easy but I know it's not. It helped me a lot, and I think developing some of the listening skills - and it is a skill - is something we could all use, as few of us really listen properly to others. That's really what makes counsellors so attractive, they do truly listen and after a session you feel you've been heard.
jane - 5-Jul-12 @ 5:54 AM
Share Your Story, Join the Discussion or Seek Advice...
Title:
(never shown)
Firstname:
(never shown)
Surname:
(never shown)
Email:
(never shown)
Nickname:
(shown)
Comment:
Validate:
Enter word:
Topics
Latest Comments
  • TAG
    Re: Paid Counselling Opportunities
    I have a level 3 counselling children and young adolescents and just gained a Grief and Bereavement Diploma allowing me to use…
    24 March 2017
  • TheCounsellorsGuide
    Re: Becoming a counsellor: A guide
    Kells - Your Question:I wrote the same amount again on last week's post, but then the site only published half of it.
    21 March 2017
  • Kells
    Re: The Cost of Training to be a Counsellor
    The costs in this article vastly understate fees for high-quality academic and skills based MA degrees, for…
    21 March 2017
  • Kells
    Re: Career Counselling
    Cindy With your experience, I'd suggest that you strongly consider doing an MA in Psychotherapy, or else an MA in Counselling Psychology, so…
    21 March 2017
  • Kells
    Re: Becoming a counsellor: A guide
    I wrote the same amount again on last week's post, but then the site only published half of it.
    21 March 2017
  • Kells
    Re: Voluntary Counselling Opportunities
    Bl??dy auto correct! I spelled your name correctly, Florise, and didn't spot the auto correct changed it. Also - it's…
    21 March 2017
  • Kells
    Re: Voluntary Counselling Opportunities
    Florine I can only say how sorry I am that you weren't given better guidance and support with your choices. Have you…
    21 March 2017
  • Florise
    Re: Voluntary Counselling Opportunities
    Thank you so much for the commentary you have written Kells. It really resonates with aspects of my own training journey…
    18 March 2017
  • Kells
    Re: Becoming a counsellor: A guide
    Daelyn I'm assuming that you are based in the U.K., and my (lengthy!)'comments are based on that. There are several highly…
    16 March 2017
  • Kells
    Re: Voluntary Counselling Opportunities
    The issue which many of those who are posting questions is going to be that the heavyweight clinical placements are…
    16 March 2017
Further Reading...
Our Most Popular...
Add to my Yahoo!
Add to Google
Stumble this
Add to Twitter
Add To Facebook
RSS feed
You should seek independent professional advice before acting upon any information on the TheCounsellorsGuide website. Please read our Disclaimer.